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Employed and self-employed tax calculator

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Annual gross salary
£
Self-employment income
£
Self-employment expenses
£
Select tax year
Income after tax
£50.1k
PAYE
£9.3k
SA
£10.6k
Taxes already sorted by your employervia Pay As You Earn – PAYE
£9,264

Income Tax

£12,500 taxed at 0%

£27,500 taxed at 20%: £5,500


National Insurance

No Class 1 NI on your first £8,632

Class 1 NI at 12% on your next £31,368: £3,764

Income Tax and NI that you need to pay via Self Assessment tax return – SA
£10,616

Income Tax

£10,000 taxed at 20%: £2,000

£18,000 taxed at 40%: £7,200


National Insurance

Class 2 NI: £156

Class 4 NI at 9% on your next £10,000: £900

Class 4 NI at 2% on your next £18,000: £360

What you’re left with
£50,120

How your taxes are calculated if you’re both employed and self-employed

As a PAYE your employer will calculate and deduct both Income Tax and National Insurance contributions for you.

Because you’ve earned over £1,000 from self-employment, you need to submit a Self Assessment tax return and pay Income Tax and National Insurance on this income.

PAYE taxes breakdown

These are all deducted from your salary by your employer every month.

You pay no Income Tax on the first £12,500 that you make.

You pay £5,500 (20%) on your salary between £12,500 and £40,000.

You pay no NI contributions on the first £8,632 that you make.

You pay £3,764 (12%) on your salary between £8,632 and £31,368

That’s not all. Your employer is also required to pay separate NI contributions, but these won’t come out of your wages. In your case they would need to pay an extra £4,329 – you should see these on your payslip.

Self-Employment tax breakdown

You will need to submit a Self Assessment tax return and pay these taxes and contributions yourself. The deadline is January 31st of the following year.

You pay £2,000 (20%) on your self-employment income between £0 and £10,000.

You pay £7,200 (40%) on your self-employment income between £10,000 and £28,000.

You will need to pay Class 2 NI worth £156.

You will also have to pay £900 (9%) on £10,000 of your self-employment income.

You will have to pay an additional £360 (2%) on another £18,000 of your self-employment income.

Common questions

You’re not alone. If you’ve got a question about tax we’ve probably heard it before and have an answer, or we can walk you through what to do.

More self-service guides and FAQs

Most people in full-time jobs who only have PAYE income never have to bother with tax returns.

The only times when you need to submit a Self Assessment tax return are:

If you’re not sure which one applies to you, read our guide to who needs to file a tax return here – it’s a long list

Yes.

If you don’t tell HMRC that you’re no longer self-employed, they’ll still expect you to file a Self Assessment tax return.

You’ll be fined if you don’t – even if you owe no tax at all.

The way you tell HMRC that you stopped being self-employed is by filing a tax return and specifying that it’s your last one.

Your UTR number is a Unique Taxpayer Reference that you get when you register for Self Assessment.

It consists of 10 digits (sometimes with a letter K at the end) and is issued to you by HMRC.

Check out our guide to getting a UTR.

Depending on your situation, you may be entitled to claim different expenses back on your Self Assessment.

If you’re self-employed you can claim expenses individually (full list here) or claim the £1,000 Trading Allowance.

If you’re a landlord, you can claim certain replacement items, renovations and if you live in the property (full list here) or claim the £1,000 Property Income Allowance.

Other general allowances can be found here for investors, high-earners and other taxpayers.

The tax code is just a series of numbers and letters that tells HMRC how much tax you should be paying.

The numbers in your tax code tell your employer or pension provider how much tax-free income you are entitled to in that tax year.

The most common one for 2019/20 will be 1250L:

  • 1250 because the Personal Allowance in 2019/20 is £12,500
  • L for the standard Personal Allowance

If you take a second job, then you don’t get a personal allowance for this one, so you need to make sure that the job that pays you the most is the one with “L” and not “BR”.

You can read more about tax codes and what they mean here

Need help filing your Self Assessment tax return?

Figuring out how much tax you owe if you’re both employed and self-employed is hard.

Correctly filing a personal tax return is even harder.

At TaxScouts, we do it for you online, fast, and for just £119, all in.

Click the button below and we’ll get you started.